Keynotes & Workshops

Thursday, February 6th

Keynote 7:30 P.M. – 9:15 P.M.

Why I Did It
& Film Screening of
The Real Dirt on Farmer John

Friday, February 7th

Keynote 8:30 A.M. – 9:45 A.M.

The Past, Present, and Future of Organic

Robert “Bob” Quinn is a progressive leader in promoting organic and sustainable agriculture throughout the state of Montana, United States, and the world. After finishing a PhD in plant biochemistry, Bob took over his family’s conventional grain and cattle farm in 1978, started experimenting with organic production in 1986, used the last chemical application on the farm in 1988, and were 100% certified organic by 1991. As demand for organics grew, Bob discovered that with time-tested practices like cover cropping and crop rotation, he can produce successful yields—without pesticides. With his company Montana Flour & Grains, he introduced the natural food industry to an ancient Egyptian wheat, called khorasan which is similar to durum wheat and marketed under his own brand name, KAMUT®. The brand name helps to preserve the ancient grain and guarantee it is not genetically modified or altered. Bob recently co-authored the book Grain by Grain: A Quest to Revive Ancient Wheat, Rural Jobs, and Healthy Food. Bob’s challenge to the next generation is to walk through the door that the pioneers of organic opened and reintroduce the world to healthy, flavorful eating. If you look at it as a two-generation project, we’re already halfway there! Bob’s new challenge to America is to be CHEMICAL FREE BY ’43!

Workshops 10:00 A.M. – 11:00 A.M.

Agricultural Succession Planning

Getting into, and out of agriculture, and how to perpetuate it.

CSAs - 30 Shares to 3,000

Water Wise

Urban agriculture faces unique challenges, including higher costs for land and water and smaller growing areas that are in close proximity to homes and businesses. Much of the urban agriculture community is focused on sustainable agriculture which conserves resources and minimize inputs. There are a variety of water efficient practices that have been incorporated to minimize usage while producing high quality produce. USU Extension, with funding support through Slow Foods Utah, have organized and choose the speaker for this water-efficient breakout session that will explore various options, including water harvesting, water reuse, improved irrigation, and more. We hope you’re able to join us!

Making Friends With Cheese, the First 15 Years of Beehive Cheese Company

I will elaborate on how we started, what we do, and who helped us get there…

Workshops 11:10 A.M. – 12:10 P.M.

Flower Farming, Production, & Sales

Full Belly Farm is one of the largest certified organic flower growers in the country. They grow over 15 acres of flowers year round, and harvest over 100 different varieties of flowers from March through November. They sell their flowers through wholesale distribution companies, at their farmers market and to stores and restaurants in Northern California. Hannah Muller is their their in-house florist, and a second generation farmer at Full Belly Farm. She will discuss the successes and failures of Full Belly Farm’s 30 years of flower farming. Come learn the process of picking seeds, what organic means to their company and market, and how they harvest, sell, pack and ship their flowers.

Overview of Biodynamic Agricultural Practices

Planting with the Moon, and Creating Your Own Regenerative Fertilizers​

Keynote 1:30 P.M. – 3:00 P.M.

Keynote 3:00 P.M. - 3:30 P.M.

Message from Utah Commissioner of Agriculture

We had previously arranged to have Commissioner Kerry Gibson speak, but he has resigned and announced that he is running for Congress. We are waiting to see who the new commissioner will be.

Keynote 3:45 P.M. - 5:00 P.M.

Where the Utah Market Has Come from, Where It Is Now, and Most of All, Where It Is Going!

Farm to Fork Dinner 6:00 P.M. - 8:00 P.M.

The Arc of Taste

Saturday, February 8th

Keynote 9:00 A.M. – 10:10 A.M.

The Three Pillars of Sustainability

Imagining farms that are economically successful, socially just, and environmentally beneficial. Sustainability is such a slippery word! We dig down deep to examine what it means, and think about how to align our values with our daily decisions.

Workshops 10:25 A.M. – 11:25 A.M.

Becoming Farmer Facilitators: Growing What People Truly Hunger for in Our Soil

The face of small family farming has changed beyond recognition in the last two decades. We no longer live in the late 1900’s Earthy Utopia of “5 acres and freedom.” Farmers today are not experiencing the same back-to-basics movement of our parents and grandparents. The ones who didn’t want to leave society for sex, drugs, and rock ‘n roll but who DID leave the cities to move to the middle of nowhere, backwater, rural America, to milk a cow and raise apples; just so they could be liberated from the press of too many people. Those first sojourners went searching for some solitude and silence. But that’s not the face of the modern family farmers.

Today we’re seeing a rebirth of social connections in our farming community. Who we’re seeing now at the farmers markets are people who have made their living away from the farms, off of the land, people who have dwelt in high-rise apartments and suburbs, and lived life in places where connectivity equals a thumbs up on Facebook, Pinterest pins, Tweets and Instagram likes; where people are sitting, alone with their lattes, in a crowded Starbucks, backs to each other, heads down, connected by technology and the false security of social media, but disconnected in person. The new face of farming are individuals who are connected socially and professionally, individuals who have been reading books about how to make it big, how to lead teams, who make good livings in their day job yet they come to the land, time and time again, drawn back to the holy Earth-because they’re hungry. But don’t be fooled into thinking they are hungry for food. The new farmer, the new farm customers, and the new farm communities are using food as a commodity to sell their true product: deep connections with one another. Our job, as agrarians in a new age, is to facilitate that connection. It will impact everything we do from marketing, branding, and social media to field cultivation and crop rotation, as we shift our focus from the self-seeking “community supported agriculture” model, to the outward focused, social entrepreneur model of “farm supported communities.”

Strategies For Accepting SNAP and Other Incentives

Would you like to learn more and or have your farmer’s market, farm stand, or CSA accept or know how to better use SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) and the double up bucks program so you can fully embrace your community?

Full representation of a community shopping at a farmers’ market, farm stands or belonging to a CSA entails reaching low-income community members. Farmers’ markets, farmstands, and CSA models that accept SNAP offer incentive programs such as Double Up Food Bucks are emerging to help low-income individuals access local products. They also connect growers with new customers. This workshop will provide research-based information on 1. benefits of accepting SNAP and incentives, 2. how market managers, farm stands, and CSA growers might incorporate SNAP into their operations.

Lavender Versatile and Sustainable; It's Not Just for Smelling

The water-wise lavender plant fits easily into closed loop systems of the permaculture realm. In this workshop Lavender Lori describes and demonstrates how she uses every last bit from her annual harvest. Even parts considered throw-away are utilized in Lori’s off grid lifestyle. As she gives her talk she’ll pass around one of those by-products; a bottle of hydrosol from her distilling process and at the end she’ll open it up to your questions.

Holistic Management

Addressing global problems with local solutions. Journey through the concentric circles from self to planet while exploring preservation, regeneration, food production, education, health care and all arts and envision how they interconnect to help sustains all the natural systems supporting this amazing boogie called life.

Workshops 11:35 A.M. – 12:35 P.M.

Regenerative Agriculture - A Key Solution to a Changing Climate

Part 1 of 2

Climate change is a controversial topic, especially amongst agriculturalists. Regardless of one’s perspective on the subject, the fact is that weather patterns are changing. Back in 1937 Franklin D. Roosevelt stated, “A nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” Today, Dr Zach Bush estimates that based on both natural and economic resources there are “60 harvests left” if we do not dramatically change the course of agriculture worldwide. Regenerative Agriculture is a practical solution to ensure that natural resources are not only preserved, but regenerated, thus ensuring that future generations will have food to eat. Soil is the Soul of societies.

In part one of the class, we will dive deep into the challenges with conventional / modern farming practices, including soil degradation, dependence on subsidies, increased dependence on chemicals and synthetic fertilizers and the lack of profitability in farming and ranching. Like David Montgomery illustrates in his book Dirt, if as citizens we don’t learn from past societies, the United States too will fail.

In the second part we will explore practical solutions that can be immediately implemented to restore our nation’s soil health. You will learn why livestock is integral to restoring soil health. Whether you are a producer, i.e. farmer or rancher, a backyard gardener or just eat food, this class will empower you to take simple, practical steps to help heal the Earth, nourish yourself and build a more resilient society.

Water Wise

Urban agriculture faces unique challenges, including higher costs for land and water and smaller growing areas that are in close proximity to homes and businesses. Much of the urban agriculture community is focused on sustainable agriculture which conserves resources and minimize inputs. There are a variety of water efficient practices that have been incorporated to minimize usage while producing high quality produce. USU Extension, with funding support through Slow Foods Utah, have organized and choose the speaker for this water-efficient breakout session that will explore various options, including water harvesting, water reuse, improved irrigation, and more. We hope you’re able to join us!

Flower Design, Weddings, Special Events, & Classes

Full Belly Farm has been growing cut flowers for wholesale and market for over 30 years. Seven years ago, one of the second generation of Full Belly Farm moved back to begin a floral design business which offers the farm’s certified organic flowers specially designed for weddings and events. Hannah Muller has started Full Belly Floral in the hopes of bringing the attention of purchasing organic and locally grown products to flowers- not just fruits and vegetables. She has utilized social media to expand her business and now arranges flowers for over 25 weddings and events a year. She also teaches hands-on floral design classes throughout the year at Full Belly Farm and other local venues around Northern California. Hannah will discuss how she started her floral design business from the ground up, how she promotes her work and will go over the nuts and bolts of how she is making the farmer/florist business model work.

Workshops 2:00 P.M. – 3:00 P.M.

Regenerative Agriculture - A Key Solution to a Changing Climate​

Part 2 of 2

Climate change is a controversial topic, especially amongst agriculturalists. Regardless of one’s perspective on the subject, the fact is that weather patterns are changing. Back in 1937 Franklin D. Roosevelt stated, “A nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” Today, Dr Zach Bush estimates that based on both natural and economic resources there are “60 harvests left” if we do not dramatically change the course of agriculture worldwide. Regenerative Agriculture is a practical solution to ensure that natural resources are not only preserved, but regenerated, thus ensuring that future generations will have food to eat. Soil is the Soul of societies.

In part one of the class, we will dive deep into the challenges with conventional / modern farming practices, including soil degradation, dependence on subsidies, increased dependence on chemicals and synthetic fertilizers and the lack of profitability in farming and ranching. Like David Montgomery illustrates in his book Dirt, if as citizens we don’t learn from past societies, the United States too will fail.

In the second part we will explore practical solutions that can be immediately implemented to restore our nation’s soil health. You will learn why livestock is integral to restoring soil health. Whether you are a producer, i.e. farmer or rancher, a backyard gardener or just eat food, this class will empower you to take simple, practical steps to help heal the Earth, nourish yourself and build a more resilient society.

The Big Why

Why do you farm? When things get hard, as they will, knowing the answer to this question can be the difference between success and failure.

Water Wise

Urban agriculture faces unique challenges, including higher costs for land and water and smaller growing areas that are in close proximity to homes and businesses. Much of the urban agriculture community is focused on sustainable agriculture which conserves resources and minimize inputs. There are a variety of water efficient practices that have been incorporated to minimize usage while producing high quality produce. USU Extension, with funding support through Slow Foods Utah, have organized and choose the speaker for this water-efficient breakout session that will explore various options, including water harvesting, water reuse, improved irrigation, and more. We hope you’re able to join us!

Keynote 3:10 P.M. – 4:10 P.M.

Vertical Agriculture: Rebuilding our Relationships

The spiritual aspects of stewardship… the part we left out when we mechanized and reduced our efforts in agriculture to purely materialistic, secular practices.

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